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Month: October 2017

Translation and analysis of “Iđitguovssu” by Máddji

Iđitguovssu – Dawn Light

Iđitguovssus girdilit
Hávski lei go iđistit
Vilges dolggiid geigestit
Várrogasat salastit

Njukča, njuvččažan
Buokčal, ligge varan
Njukča, njuvččažan
Ovdal iđitroađi

Iđitguovssus girdilit
Hávski lei go iđistit
Jaskatvuođain savkalit
Nuorravuođain njávkalit

Riegádahte áibbašeami
Oktovuođa váillaheami

English translation

Iđitguovssus girdilit
You flew in from the dawn

Hávski lei go iđistit
What a wonderful sight when you emerged

Vilges dolggiid geigestit
You flapped out your white feathers

Várrogasat salastit
You carefully gave a short embrace

Njukča, njuvččažan
Swan, my little swan

Buokčal, ligge varan
Dive, heat my blood

Njukča, njuvččažan
Swan, my little swan

Ovdal iđitroađi
Before the red of morning

Jaskatvuođain savkalit
You whispered softly

Nuorravuođain njávkalit
You caressed youthfully

Iđitguovssus girdilit
Hávski lei go iđistit
Jaskatvuođain savkalit
Nuorravuođain njávkalit

Riegádahte áibbašeami
Bring out my yearning

Oktovuođa váillaheami
The longing of the lonely

Detailed analysis

Iđitguovssus girdilit
You flew in from the dawn

iđit – morning
guovssu – dawn
girdilit – fly away, take off

girdilan – I fly
girdilat – You fly
girdila – He/she/it flies

girdilin – I flew
girdilit – You flew
girdilii – He/she/it flies

iđitguovssus – locative form of “iđitguovssu”. Locative means “at, on, in, from a location”

Hávski lei go iđistit
What a wonderful sight when you emerged

hávski – nice, aggreeable
lei – sight, view
go – when, as
iđistit – emerge

iđistan – I emerge
iđistat – You emerge
iđista – He/she/it emerges

iđistin – I emerged
iđistit – You emerged
iđistii – He/she/it emerged

Vilges dolggiid geigestit
You flapped out your white feathers

vilges – white (adj)
vielgadas – white (noun)

dolgi – feather
dolggiid – feather (plural accusative)

geiget – stretch out, line up, hand over

geigen – I stretch out
geiget – You stretch out
geige – He/she/it stretches out

Every time a verb has that kind of -stit suffix, it means that it’s a quick, or short, action.

geigestit – to flap out

geigestan – I flap out
geigestat – You flap out
geigestat – He/she/it flaps out

geigestin – I flapped out
geigestit – You flapped out
geigestii – He/she/it flapped out

Várrogasat salastit
You carefully gave a short embrace

várrogas/várrugas – careful
várrogasat – careful (plural nominative attributive)

salastit – quick or short embrace

salastat – You embrace
salsatit – You embraced

Njukča, njuvččažan
Swan, my little swan

njukča – swan
njuvččažan – swan (singular nominative possessive), -žan is the suffix to indicate some kind of endearment

Buokčal, ligge varan
Dive, heat my blood

buokčat – to dive
buovččan – I dive
buovččat – You dive
buokčá – He/she/it dives

buokčal – You dive (imperative)

ligget – to warm up

liggen – I warm up
ligget – You warm up
ligge – He/she/it warms up

ligge – You warm up (imperative)

varra – blood (singular nominative first person)

Njukča, njuvččažan
Swan, my little swan

Ovdal iđitroađi
Before the red of morning

ovdal – before, beforehand, earlier, previously
iđit – morning
roađđi – red
roađi – of red (genitive)

Iđitguovssus girdilit
You flew in from the dawn

Hávski lei go iđistit
What a wonderful sight when you emerged

Jaskatvuođain savkalit
You whispered softly

jaska – quietly
jaskat – quiet

jaskatvuohta – silence
jaskatvuođain – singular comitative, plural comitative, “with silence”

-vuohta turns a verb into a noun
e.g. ráhkisvuohta – love (noun), from ráhkistit – to love

savkalit – to whisper

savakalat – You whisper
savakalit – You whispered

Nuorravuođain njávkalit
You caresed youthfully

nuorravuohta – youth
nuorravuođain – singular comitative, plural comitative, “with youth”

njávkalat – You caress
njávkalit – You caressed

Riegádahte áibbašeami
Bring out my yearning

riegádahttit – to bring out

riegádahtán – I bring out
riegádahtát – You bring out
riegádahttá – He/she/it brings out

riegádahte – You bring out (imperative)

áibbašit – to yearn
áibbašan – I yearn

áibbašeapmi – yearning
áibbašeami – genitive, of yearning

Oktovuođa váillaheami
The longing of the lonely

oktovuohta – loneliness
oktovuođa – genitive, of loneliness

váillahit – to lack, need
váillaheapmi – those who lack, or are in need of something
váillaheami – accusative form

-heapmi turns a verb or adjective into a noun

Your language is part of who you are

I hope that one day people will treat the language someone speaks like they do characteristics like eye colour or height. The more I learn  about languages the more I realise that language is fundamentally human. The language someone speaks natively says something about who they  are. Language is brought to a place by those who speak it. You only speak the language you speak because someone brought the language to  your area and those around you spoke it while you were growing up.

Because language is such an ever present part of our lives, things can get very messy. People look down on those who speak certain languages  because of associations they have with the group that speaks that language. The only way around this is to make people aware of what is  actually happening out in the world and to correct any misinformation or lack of knowledge people have. I can’t fix what people don’t know about history or politics or mathematics. But I can teach people about language.

One thing I know for sure. You should never be ashamed of the language you speak. Your language is the result of centuries and centuries of  evolution and change performed by ordinary people. Your language is an organism. It is like the fauna and flora of the world. It developed naturally. It is something to be proud of. Your language is part of who you are.

Each language carries in it the thoughts, feelings, hopes and dreams of its people. Each time we lose a language, we lose an expression of what it means to be human. I always liked language before, but I see even more clearly now how marvellous and special language is.

Language is an inextricable part of culture. People know the language they know because of the culture they live in. A part of the reason languages die is because they stop being spoken by native speakers and thus don’t get passed on to future generations. Because language is a part of culture, cultural forces affect languages. If a culture decides that their language is no longer worth learning, it will probably disappear.

Maybe in a small way I can change that just by saying: Your language matters. Never be ashamed of your language. Your language is beautiful, messy, chaotic and wonderful. It is part of who you are and it is worth preserving.